The People Give the Orders and the Government Obeys

The People Give the Orders and the Government Obeys

The sign above is located in the state of Chiapas in Mexico. In English, it says, “You are in the territory of Zapatista in Rebellion. Here, the people give the orders and the government obeys”.

Well, of course, what that really means is that the Zapatistas give the orders, not the people as a whole. Still, the people generally regard the Zapatistas as being more representative of their wishes (and less parasitical) than the government.

Santimaniacs. An article by Jeff Thomas.

Sanctimania

In recent decades, political correctness has been very much on the rise in the countries that were formerly regarded as the “free world.”

It’s important to remind those who live in these countries (North America, Europe, etc.), that political correctness is not by any means as prevalent in the rest of the world.

Leave Home. An article by Jeff Thomas.

Leave Home

As an increasing number of people realise that their home country is becoming a liability to them, the most common question I hear from them is, “What do I have to do to remain where I am and still be assured that I’ll be able to retain both my wealth and my freedom?”

The Final Blowout Sale

The Final Blowout Sale

Increasingly, both Europeans and North Americans whom I meet are expressing their concern that the social structure of their countries appears to be breaking down. Americans and Canadians speak of people of who, for making an off-handed comment that could possibly be interpreted as racist, can lose their livelihoods as a result. In the UK, it’s worse, with people being sentenced to prison for publicly denouncing rapes of children by Muslims in UK cities.

Services Rendered. An article by: Jeff Thomas.

Services Rendered

Here we have a standard credit card receipt from a coffee shop. The diner understands that he’s not obligated to order anything that he doesn’t want to receive, but that, for whatever he does order, he must pay the price on the menu.

If It Gets Bad, I’ll Go to Idaho

If It Gets Bad, I’ll Go to Idaho

In the 1930’s, the farm population in the US was nearly 25% of the total and it was quite common for farmers to borrow from the bank (using their farms as collateral) in the expectation that the proceeds from their annual crop would pay off the note each year.